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5 Questions For Sex Cultural Revolutionary Polly Whittaker

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Have you ever met someone and instantly fallen in love with who they are and everything they stand for? Well, that’s exactly what happened when I met Polly Whittaker. She popped into the sexy shop where I work looking to speak to the owner and leave a copy of her book, Polly Sex Culture Revolutionary. The owner wasn’t in the shop that day but I was. It was kismet. Fifteen minutes and one hug later; I was dazzled by her awesomeness.  I began reading her book the next day, and I was instantly inspired. 

 I had been in dire need of a push to keep on doing what I’m doing, and it came to me in the form Polly Superstar. Polly is the type of person I’d like to be when I grow up; passionate, effervescent, and focused on making the world a better place by spreading the gospel of sex positivity and pleasure.   I am honored to be a part of her Revolutionary Blog Tour along with so many awesome sex positive people. I love sharing the amazing people I meet with all of you, and I know you’ll fall for Polly just like I did.

Follow your dreams and magic will happen.”- Polly Whittaker

 

1. You describe yourself as a 21st century sex culture revolutionary. What exactly is a sex culture revolutionary, and how can I become one?

Lola, you’re already a sex culture revolutionary! We are people who passionately believe that culture’s relationship to sex is unbalanced, and we work tirelessly to help change that. We are sex educators, porn producers, sex party hosts, bloggers, activists, comedians, and performers. The sexual revolution isn’t something that happened in the ‘60s, it’s an active part of our culture that continues to this day. The last fifty years have seen so much change, as the revolution continues to turn it needs people like us to push it forward. I believe that when we live in a society where sex isn’t shameful or wrong, people will be happier and healthier.

 

2.The main reason I created Sex Ed. A Go-Go was to spark more sex positive conversations outside of the sex positive community. What are your thoughts on this new wave of sex positive educators and activist, and what could we be doing better?

I think it’s inspiring. In a country where abstinence only sex education in schools has been the norm, independent sex educators are sometimes the only access to real information teenagers have. The internet is what has made this possible, with podcasters, youtubers and bloggers sharing their opinions and ideas. The only potential pitfall I can see is an internet-wide problem, and that’s quality control. With so many conflicting opinions it can sometimes be tough to figure out what’s true. That’s why I love what you’re doing. By creating a blog that isn’t just about sex education, but about the educators themselves, you are providing a needed service to help people vet the quality of the information they are tuning into.  

 3. What made you decide to finally chronicle your amazing life?

When I first started writing it wasn’t a memoir. It was a manual, teaching people how to throw Kinky Salons. I realized that people responded better when I told them the stories about why something was done in a particular way rather than just telling them how to do it. So I started writing the stories about all the different elements of Kinky Salon. Then one day I had writers block and I followed the advice of a friend—just write about anything to get your creativity flowing. I wrote about my father’s death. It was the most powerful thing I had ever written and I realized that this was the story that needed to be told. The real story behind the sexiness and the good times. It completely changed the direction of the book which became a much more personal story.

 

4. What do you hope to accomplish by sharing your story?

 When I wrote down my story it was really just an act of making art. I wasn’t thinking about my audience or my target market. I just needed to write, to get it out. The process of writing and editing the book was very healing. I faced some truths about myself, and my past, and made connections I never would have made without writing the book. Writing it down revealed what the book was about, not the other way around. If I can reach one person who had a similar experience, who can be comforted or inspired by reading my story, then I consider myself successful.

 

5. Who are you hoping your book reaches?

I want my book to reach people who never thought they would be able to relate to my story. I want to demystify the world I live in and break apart long held assumptions. I know that I’ve had a pretty unconventional life. My liberal parents and my artistic streak definitely give me a unique outlook, but there are some stories that are universal. Loss of a parent and heartbreak are common themes for people. We have all experienced these situations to lesser or greater degrees. I want to find the places where I connect with people more than I want to explore the differences. If my story can touch people who feel ashamed, or sad, or desperate, and help them know that there are people out there who feel the same way, then I will have achieved something meaningful and worthwhile.

  
This post is part of the Polly: Sex Culture Revolutionary Virtual Book Tour. If you make a comment in the thread below you’ll be automatically entered in a chance to WIN a LIMITED EDITION signed hardcover copy of Polly: Sex Culture Revolutionary.
The comedian Margaret Cho called it “Raw, untamed, emotional beauty–Polly is a true supernova. This memoir is as touching as it is hot, as moving as it is a masterpiece.”
Buy your copy of Polly: Sex Culture Revolutionary bit.ly/pollybook
Join Polly’s mailing list bit.ly/pollyslist
Check out Polly’s website pollysuperstar.com
Follow Polly on Twitter twitter.com/pollysuperstar
Get updates from Polly on Facebook facebook.com/itsmepolly
Click the image below to check out the other exciting stops on the tour.